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September 27, 2013

10

Special Bibingka (Ilocano-Filipino Style)

by Mymy
special bibingka

Special bibingka in Ilocos Region is one of the most famous “pasalubong”. When you travel in Ilocos riding in a bus, there are vendors who hop in a bus selling bibingka, kalamay, chichacorn, puto and others.

In fact when you go to Vigan, Ilocos Sur, there’s this famous bibingka house called Royal bibingka where their specialty is the special royal bibingka. And I must say that their bibingka is extra special…it’s very, very tasty without any exaggeration. Also, in Luna, La Union, there are several residents who own a small business that specializes in making “bibingka”, “tupig or buyos” and other kakanins. They supply the stalls in Bauang, La Union where buses going to Baguio have a stop over.

There are times that I crave for special bibingka and since I am miles away from the Philippines, I come up with my own version of it…at least close enough I bet! My husband tells me so and he loves it! :-D Try it and let me know by leaving a comment below, if the taste resembles to the famous royal bibingka. Hehe!

special bibingka

special bibingka

Ingredients:
2 cups glutinous rice flour
1 cup coconut milk
1/2 cup fresh milk or evaporated milk
1 & 1/2 cup condensed milk or 1 can of condensed milk
1/4 cup butter
4 yolks of large eggs
1/2 box of kraft eden cheese – grated
IMG_6065
Note: The best type of cheese to use as toppings is the Kraft Eden cheddar cheese. It just happened that I don’t have that kind of cheese when I made this bibingka so I used cream cheese instead. It’s still taste good but cream cheese is best for frosting and it melts very easily.

Procedure:
1) Melt the butter and use the 1/4 of it to grease the foil or pan where you pour the bibingka mixture.
2) In a large bowl, mix the glutinous rice flour, coconut milk, fresh milk, condensed milk, egg yolks and the melted butter. Mix thoroughly until well-blended.
special bibingka
3) Preheat oven to 375 degrees Fahrenheit. While the oven starts to heat, pour the bibingka mixture into the baking pan and cover it with an aluminum foil then bake for 25 minutes.
special bibingka
4) Remove the pan from the oven, now that the bibingka is half baked, sprinkle it with the grated cheese.
5) Bake the bibingka again for another 25 to 30 minutes, this time uncovered. You’ll know it’s done when the top layer of the bibingka turns to light brown. Let it cool under room temperature then ready to serve. Share and enjoy! :-)
IMG_6072

10 Comments Post a comment
  1. Michael Guzi Guzman
    Jun 6 2014

    U Ddnt mention how much sugar..

    Reply
    • Jun 19 2014

      Hello Michael! Thanks for visiting our website. I don’t really put sugar because the condensed milk is enough to make the bibingka sweet and believe me, the texture is softer and it’s tastier when you put condensed milk to make it sweet than white sugar. Try it and I hope you like it. :-)

      Reply
    • Aug 26 2014

      Hello Michael…There’s really no sugar in my bibingka because I only used condensed milk in making it sweet. it’s creamier and softer and the sweetness is just right.

      Reply
  2. Aug 3 2014

    Try to use rice flour, instead of glutionous maam.

    Reply
    • Aug 26 2014

      Thanks for the suggestion Cathy. Yes, I also use rice flour sometimes when glutinous rice flour is not available in my kitchen and it’s yummy too! :-)

      Reply
  3. Lifes Free
    Nov 16 2014

    Hi I have been looking the ilocano recipe for bibingka just like the bibingka being sale in Bawang La Union that I used to buy when I pass by and the Bibingka in Candon. Inotice that when eaten it is sticky and elastic and thought that it is made of glutinous rice. But when I do research on the recipe I find out that most suggest rice flour. I want to know what is the difference of rice flour and glutinous flour when it comes to bibingka. All I know about riceflour is the puto and if I will make bibingka out of it might be it is not elastic. I want the elastic bibingka like a buble gum when your are eating it. Hope I can an answer here. Thank you po.

    Reply
    • Feb 19 2015

      Hello “life’s free”. Thank you for viewing this recipe. Rice flour is the “galapong” in Tagalog. Correct me if i’m wrong, eto po yung pinapagiling o nagiling na sa palengke. I prefer to use the packed glutinous rice flour because it’s really softer and more like “elastic” when eaten. So I achieved the consistency of my recipe by using just the packed glutinous rice flour. Glutinous rice or sweet rice is the “malagkit” in tagalog or “diket” in Ilocano. So basically they’re all the same but it’s just a matter of how the flour is processed. There are 2 types of bibingka actually. 1st is the one made of “galapong” or rice flour and it’s cooked with buko, itlog maalat and thru banana leaves and charcoal. 2nd is more of soft, creamy, elastic when eaten, with cheese toppings and it is baked or sometimes sa “kugon” (traditional way of baking) niluluto. My version of bibingka is the 2nd type. Closed to famous bibingka in Vigan or the one sold in Bauang. So if you want the softer type of bibingka, I suggest you use the packed glutinous rice flour, if not…the super refined “giniling malagkit”. Hope I answered your question.

      Reply
  4. rona
    Feb 19 2015

    Thank you for this delicious recipe. I used rice flour instead of glutinous rice flour result is may pagkamatigas po. Ano po dapat gawin para maging malambot? Thank you :)

    Reply
    • Feb 19 2015

      Hi Rona! Thank you for trying this recipe. That’s the reason why I prefer to use the packed glutinous flour than the rice flour. Rice flour is the “galapong” in Tagalog. Correct me if i’m wrong, eto po yung pinapagiling o nagiling na sa palengke. Sometimes kung di pino o kaya magaspang pagkagiling nagiging matigas po talaga o magaspang kalalabasan ng bibingka. That’s why I prefer to use the packed glutinous rice flour because it’s really softer and more like “elastic” when eaten. So I achieved the consistency of my recipe by using just the packed glutinous rice flour. Glutinous rice or sweet rice is the “malagkit” in tagalog or “diket” in Ilocano. So basically they’re all the same but it’s just a matter of how the flour is processed. There are 2 types of bibingka actually. 1st is the one made of “galapong” or rice flour and it’s cooked with buko, itlog maalat and thru banana leaves and charcoal. 2nd is more of soft, creamy, elastic when eaten, with cheese toppings and it is baked or sometimes sa “kugon” (traditional way of baking) niluluto. My version of bibingka is 2nd type. Closed to famous bibingka in Vigan. So if you want the softer type of bibingka, i suggest you use the packed glutinous rice flour, if not…the super refined “giniling malagkit”. Hope I answered your question.

      Reply
  5. che
    Feb 27 2015

    Cream cheese is far different from cheddar cheese you know.. It’ll just ruin your bibingka, I think its better off without any cheese if you don’t have any on hand rather than using cream cheese. Just saying.

    Reply

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